Death toll rises from Haitian cholera outbreak

Read the original news 

VOV News English - 52 month(s) ago 4 readings

Death toll rises from Haitian cholera outbreak

A fast-moving cholera outbreak in Haiti has claimed at least 208 lives on October 23, according to a UN spokeswoman. The country's health ministry is reporting another 2,364 cases from the recent outbreak, said Imogen Wall, spokeswoman for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. This comes after recent heavy rains caused the banks of the Artibonite River to overflow and flood the area. Dammed in 1956 to create Lac de Peligre, the Artibonite River is Haiti's dominant drainage system. On October 22, officials with the US Centres for Disease Control and the US Agency for International Development discussed the outbreak and efforts to work out a containment strategy. The CDC will send an 11-member team to Haiti over the next few days to find out which antibiotics will be most effective in treating the cholera outbreak. US AID will provide supplies needed to set up treatment centers. The group has already prepositioned 300,000 oral re-hydration kits and are distributing water purification kits in affected areas. Officials also confirmed that all the reported cases are in the Artibonite and Central Plateau regions, north of Port-au-Prince. They said they're working to contain the outbreak there and prevent its spread to the densely populated capital. Chaos reigned across the Artibonite and Central Plateau regions on October 22, as hospitals overflowed with people rushing to get help from the fast-moving cholera outbreak. Cholera is caused by a bacterial infection of the intestine and, in severe cases, is characterized by diarrhea, vomiting and leg cramps, according to the U.S.-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In such cases, rapid loss of body fluids can lead to dehydration and shock. "Without treatment, death can occur within hours," the agency says. CNN/VOVNews

The country's health ministry is reporting another 2,364 cases from the recent outbreak, said Imogen Wall, spokeswoman for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

This comes after recent heavy rains caused the banks of the Artibonite River to overflow and flood the area. Dammed in 1956 to create Lac de Peligre, the Artibonite River is Haiti's dominant drainage system.

On October 22, officials with the US Centres for Disease Control and the US Agency for International Development discussed the outbreak and efforts to work out a containment strategy.

The CDC will send an 11-member team to Haiti over the next few days to find out which antibiotics will be most effective in treating the cholera outbreak. US AID will provide supplies needed to set up treatment centers. The group has already prepositioned 300,000 oral re-hydration kits and are distributing water purification kits in affected areas.

Officials also confirmed that all the reported cases are in the Artibonite and Central Plateau regions, north of Port-au-Prince. They said they're working to contain the outbreak there and prevent its spread to the densely populated capital.

Chaos reigned across the Artibonite and Central Plateau regions on October 22, as hospitals overflowed with people rushing to get help from the fast-moving cholera outbreak.

Cholera is caused by a bacterial infection of the intestine and, in severe cases, is characterized by diarrhea, vomiting and leg cramps, according to the U.S.-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In such cases, rapid loss of body fluids can lead to dehydration and shock. "Without treatment, death can occur within hours," the agency says.

There is no comment

Please Sign up or Login to comment.

Top page